675.cc • Triumph 675 Forum

Degree in life??

Discussion in 'Rants & Raves' started by Lewi675SE, Jul 24, 2014.

  1. Lewi675SE

    Lewi675SE

    Thread Starter

    261
    5
    18
    Location: Leeds
    Apologies in advance for the rant - I need an outlet

    I am currently on the career search. It seems however you need to have decided at 15 years old what you want to be for the next 60 years and gained your very specific degree for that specific job. That is of course unless your happy to start again on £16,000 per year as an apprentice (if there are any available) or, you have conjured up 'experience' in the exact job your going for, and as a non-disabled, straight, white male theres no special consideration/entry that way either.

    Who employs actual people who could be very good for the job- obviously qualifications are essential as is experience and skills.

    I just wish there was a highly regarded masters degree in life!
     
  2. Pet hate of mine is this great tag we put on having exams. What they tell you is that a person is very good at either producing course work and/or having the ability to sit and study for hours on end and then remember this all to put on an exam paper. It doesn't tell you what life skills and common sense they have.

    I remember back when I was 20 we had a lad come to work for us who had passed his a levels. He started the job and started taking the industry exams. A year into it a colleague asked him a question which was basic stuff he should have picked up within the first couple of weeks. He had to ask someone for the answer. Yet this stuff had been covered in the first of the two exams he had just passed. His quality was that after a full days work he had no problem going home each night and reading text books to memorise to pass an exam. Yet he had no common sense and could not relate things in these books to actual situations. If we had gone head to head for a place on an interview his knowledge on paper would have got it, however if it got to the situation where we had both been interviewed then I'm confident to know who would have got the job.

    20+ years on and we are both still in same industry. He still works for same company basically doing the same job although he has professional qualifications behind him. Me I have my own account bank of clients, built up from scratch and clients that say to me if you leave we are moving with you. Professional qualifications None. Interpersonal skills and common sense, shit loads. And yes I have been blowing my own trumpet lol
     
  3. D41

    D41

    13,919
    139
    63
    Location: Orange, CA
    I don't know the answer.....you learn as you go I guess - I've been in flooring for 27-28 years, now all of a sudden people introduce me as being a comedian....I could never in my life have imagined that happening - it doesn't pay yet, but that will change soon enough.
    I miss my old job a lot, but I'm disabled now, so it's out of the question.....and so I guess I've found my new vocation...I roll with it.
     
  4. you can blame the labour government for thier brilliant idea of getting everyone to uni to get a degree

    now that everyone has one a lot of jobs wont even consider you without one
     
  5. Edski675

    Edski675 Administrator Staff Member

    Daughter is 16 and hasn't really got much idea of what she wants to do in life. Makes it even worse when most of her cohort at school have settled on what they think they want to do, and she still doesn't know.
     
  6. cpszx

    cpszx

    1,703
    440
    83
    Location: Chatteris
    my middle one is 19, and has the same problem!
    frustrating, but also familiar.... ;)
     
  7. cpszx

    cpszx

    1,703
    440
    83
    Location: Chatteris
    had the same issues when using agencies, where i dont have some of the industry acronym qualifications, but do have the knowledge and experience

    it means in a lot of cases you cannot even get shortlisted for an interview, even if you can do the job blindfolded
    but the ones you do get an interview for, you get shortlisted for the job right away.

    last time i was looking and sending CV, i started using the acronyms in text, saying "experienced and knowledgeable to ABCD level", mentored and coached EFGH candidates in preparation for their IJKL, etc.

    it gets a hit and most agencies dont bother reading the detail, just the pattern hit counter ;)
     
  8. Deegee

    Deegee Moderator Staff Member

    7,934
    2
    38
    Location: In the Garage.
    Been all through this nonsense, applied for a couple of jobs doing just one facet of my old job, in that old job I was rated above the job I actually applied for, however the new job requires an xyz qualification which was not required for the old higher rated job, needless to say I got bumped simply because their search engine didn't turn up that qualification. I wouldn't have minded but they specified exactly the experience I had 20+ years of in the job description. :roll:

    It's like saying you have to be an elephant to do this job, but when people turn up with a trunk and big ears they say you can't do the job. Bloody madness.
     
  9. When I was last looking recruitment agencies were nightmares. I would send cv and they would ring me saying they have x position to which I would point out I'm not experienced at or they would ring asking questions all of which are in my cv. They don't read cv's half the time. All they seem interested in is the candidate likely to fill the position quickest so they can get their commission, therefore if you are already in work against someone looking for work they often won't even put you forward. Another frustration is half the jobs the advertise don't actually exist yet or have been filled yet they use them to gather cv's and make them look like agencies at top of tree.

    My Mrs is taking vol redundancy so from 1st December needs a new job. Amount of agencies they say they won't look for her as too early, yet with her experience many employers may be willing to wait. One agency said could she not leave earlier to which she pointed out she wasn't giving up £16k redundancy for sake of 2 months
     
  10. Captain Steffydog

    Captain Steffydog Moderator Staff Member

    18,867
    1,062
    113
    Location: East London/Essex
    When I get calls from the agencies I always ask, "so what was it about my CV that made you call me today?" And I just live those that ask for your email address, that'll be the one next to my phone number, that you've called me on!?
     
  11. I get pissed off when they put you forward for a job then you don't here a fucking thing. Common courtesy to keep people informed whether good or bad. Had 1 agency send my cv (unknown to me) to my mate who runs his own business. He rang me up saying you looking for new job then? Gave agency a right royal roasting
     
  12. Most likely because they never put you forward in the first place. I phoned up to check once and the client had never heard of me. I asked if they'd like me to send my CV direct, and I got the gig.

    To be fair, when you consider how agencies & agents work, the kind of service we intuitively expect would be expensive. The cost tends to be hidden from us as employees/suppliers, so we don't think of it.

    I'm a contractor so job hunting is a twice a year - or once if I'm lucky - chore. I can understand how it's much harder to see it as par for the course as an employee. I was lucky before I went freelance insofar as I never got as far as speaking with an agent without getting the job at the end of it. 4 jobs unless I forgot something.
     
  13. It's not much better when you already have a job and want to progress. As most places I have worked they give me a job and I get on with it, new person arrives can't do it so gets on a training course. Promotion Time they get the job as you are not qualified.

    About to go back to Uni myself to finish my honours degree. The first two years part time that took 4 years and I was mostly day dreaming in the lectures as I had covered most of it during my working life. Only really doing it for the bit of paper, an expensive bit of paper. My current employer does not know that I will be asking for a day off a week soon for two years so that should be an interesting conversation as currently I am doing two jobs at the same time as 2 people left at the same time, but with 10 years experience and no documentation in the company I have the upper hand.
     
  14. I worked at a place and my work, diary etc. was always up to date with work done right 1st time. A colleague of mine let his diary reminders get to 11 pages, some items 6 months o/s. Found out they paid him a bonus of £600 if he got his diary up to date within. 2 week period. I was fucking furious but couldn't say anything as it would have dropped a colleague in accounts right in it. Trouble was all the guy did was change the diary dates for dates 3 months in future.

    Same guy who it came to company car change got the one with all the whistles and bells. I got the lx model. Why, cause he only done 9000 miles a year and I did 30,000. So why the fuck did he need a company car! Coz it wasn't fair if I had one and he didn't.
     
  15. mush

    mush Yam Black Country Lad

    931
    27
    28
    Location: Dudley
    Ahh thorn in my side this one, your either to old with loads of experience or of the right age 24,25 and lacking the 15 years experience they require makes you laugh in a sad way...........
     
  16. Edski675

    Edski675 Administrator Staff Member

    At age 53 I'm all but unemployable. I'm self-employed, it's damn hard at times, especially when I have to do cold calling. At times I could do with a part time job, but like everyone else, the agency is all for it then it goes eerily quiet. I've got used to it now and I no longer challenge, I just resolve to do better myself.
     
  17. D41

    D41

    13,919
    139
    63
    Location: Orange, CA
    Look on the bright side Ed.....at 47 I'm disabled....probably for life - one stupid overtake is all it took, and the only thing that saved me was I stayed on the road, otherwise I would have been impaled on some crappy fence post.

    It's not all bad....EDD pay me almost as much as if I were working...and I made decent money - I get paid to sit and watch TV, which is kinda cool....I fucking love being disabled!!
     
  18. Ed, you are not that far ahead of me. Now your making me depressed. ;-)
     
  19. midgey46

    midgey46

    3,433
    225
    63
    Location: Peterborough
    I'm 21, 22 next month, didn't have that much of an idea what I wanted to do at 16! Apart from a Pro Golfer or Bike Racer.. Not the easiest things to get into or be good enough at!!!

    Was only by a bit of a fluke I came across an Engineering Apprenticeship, 3yr Apprenticeship later I have that bit of paper for life. 6yrs in the same job now.

    Never know when you'll know what you want to do or how you'll come across it!!

    I do agree very much so with the OP. Where I work the apprentices we have more and more each year quite frankly are thick as shit. Yet the guys who are 'just operators' at any age range are some of the smartest people iv ever known!! The fact they can't get the same job as these useless spotty time wasting teens is ridiculous.

    And no, I really wasn't like that when I was in their situation at the start of my career!

    The only thing id recommend to anyone with young kids is try and get them into any Apprenticeship early on, once they get that bit of paper it will always be there and valid. Go on and change what you do, decide it's not quite for you, you'll always have that to fall back on.

    Especially Engineering, it's ridiculously easy, shockingly easy in fact.
     
  20. Deegee

    Deegee Moderator Staff Member

    7,934
    2
    38
    Location: In the Garage.
    I know we are slightly off topic, so apologies for that, however I'm not sure Engineering is easy, I always thought so until I had to teach it, Then I found there's a lot of people in engineering that would be better suited to anything else but. If you've got the right type of mind it's easy, it's fun, it's rewarding and appeases my lifelong curiosity about how things work. It's easy if you're a natural engineer in my limited experience.
     

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. By using this website you agree to our Cookies usage. We and our partners operate globally and use cookies, including for analytics, personalisation, ads and Newsletters:
    Dismiss Notice