675.cc • Triumph 675 Forum

Valve clearance adjustment help needed on a 2013 Daytona

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Tweaks' started by wobblybiker99, Oct 21, 2018.

  1. wobblybiker99

    wobblybiker99

    Thread Starter

    657
    96
    28
    As part of my plan to do all my own servicing i've stripped the bike down to check the valve clearances and unfortunately all six exhaust valves are outside the tolerance (all tight).
    If i'm honest it was more work than i expected just to get to the this stage, the amount of things to disconnect or remove and everything crammed is a tight space, i'm now wondering if i've reached the limit of my confidence and competence and i think removing the camshafts and re-shimming might be a step too far for me, given the consequences of a mistake.
    The service manual shows two different triumph tools are needed to keep the camshaft timing (a timing plate and pin), is it safe or even possible to do the job without these tools?

    Ideally i'd like to do it myself and if i had the triumph tools and someone to walk me through it first time i probably would.

    I've fired off an email to muddysump but not sure if he would even do the valve clearances on their own with the bike already stripped?, always seems to be booked up anyway.

    The clearances range from 0.290 up to 0.320mm with the limit being 0.325-0.375mm, i know its hard to say but do you think these clearances will be causing any issues as yet being as they are only 0.035mm tight at worst, 10% of the total clearance, the bike currently is on 18,000miles.

    Do people normally get away with re-using the cam cover gasket, the manual says to replace but as its a thick rubber seal and in good nick will it be ok to re-fit

    Sorry for all the questions but i know there's some good engine guys on here.:D
     
  2. In the mix

    In the mix

    155
    7
    18
    Location: Uk
    Definitely change the cam cover seal and the rubber washers under the cam cover bolts, you don’t need the pin and plate to remove the cams for shimming just set #1 cyl at tdc before you undo anything. The pin and plate method allows you to reset the cam timing to compensate for cam chain stretch you would also need the manual tensioner tool and the 0.6nm torque adaptor tool to do this.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  3. wobblybiker99

    wobblybiker99

    Thread Starter

    657
    96
    28
    Thanks for the reply, i'm using the service manual but there is no start to finish process for the cam timing, all separate processes such as removing airbox/cam cover etc, the one for removing cams shows these tools being used so thats were i'm confused.
    It makes sense that if i'm not changing parts (apart from shims) and don't have to remove the sprockets then if i set it on the marks and put everything back in the same position the timing should still be ok?
    One thing i'm worried about is the cam chain/tensioner, when i remove the tensioner to create some slack it says i need to wedge the blade against the chain, is this to stop it falling in the crankcase, what do you use for this?
    What do you do with the chain once off the sprockets, i imagine you have to string it up to stop it falling in the crankcase?
    Do i just put the cam chain tensioner back in it was (standard automatic), will it move when i take it out, will it need resetting?
    Also any links for cheap shims, anybody do an exchange, i'll have six that'll be no good to me?

    Thanks again:D
     
  4. JohnnyPS4

    JohnnyPS4

    1,228
    296
    83
    Location: Buxton




    These should help if you've not watched them before, for a tiger 800 but the 675 uses the same layout etc etc, as far as I am aware dealers do an exchange with shims
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  5. wobblybiker99

    wobblybiker99

    Thread Starter

    657
    96
    28
    Thanks for that, i hadn't seen them even though i've been on his website and even watched other vids in the past i think:confused:
    It looks much easier now watching somebody do it, the service manual made it look really daunting.
    I think i'll tackle it myself following the vid, there looks a lot more room under there than on a Daytona though, and unfortunately i had to remove the throttle bodies because the stupid crosshead screws on the cable bracket wouldn't budge:mad:, i'll try and swap them for allen heads later.
    I hope your right about the shims, might save me a bit, bloody cam cover gasket/seals alone are £50.
    I think i need a smaller torque wrench as well for the cams, mines a bit of a brute.
     
  6. wobblybiker99

    wobblybiker99

    Thread Starter

    657
    96
    28
    Here are my gap readings
    EX 0.350 0.300 0.290 0.290 0.300 0.290 spec is 0.325-0.375mm
    IN 0.190 0.180 0.190 0.200 0.200 0.200 spec is 0.100-0.200mm

    I know that exhaust gaps will generally tighten up so do i shim them back to the looser end of the spec or just back to middle spec?
    Do inlet gaps do the opposite and tend to loosen over time with cam/bucket wear, i'm thinking while i've got to do the exhaust gaps anyway is it worth shimming the inlets back to the tighter end of the spec?
     
  7. wobblybiker99

    wobblybiker99

    Thread Starter

    657
    96
    28
    Quick update, everything re-shimmed and back together following Muddysumps videos and service manual, engine started ok with no warning lights, noises or leaks:D, used moly grease/oil mix when assembling and spun it up on the starter until oil light went out before firing up, not ridden yet but it sounds ok so i'm happy with my first go at valve shimming.
    Decided to put all the Exhaust gaps back to middle or just above as they tend to tighten, all now between 0.350-0.365mm. Put all Inlet gaps back to middle or just below as they are tending to loosen, all now between 0.140-0.150mm.
    Even though i've done 11 valves i managed to do 6 by swapping existing shims and only had to buy 5 new, only gaskets/seals replaced were timing cover gasket and o rings under cam ladder as they were squashed, all others that looked (and measured) fine were put back and nothings leaking, touch wood.
    Total cost just over £50, not bad for 11 valves re-shimmed, could have reduced that further if i got the shims on Ebay.
    Did splash out on some new plugs even though they looked fine as with all the gaps done it shouldn't need disturbing now for at least another 12,000miles.
    Learned a lot in the process and i would say if you've got reasonable mechanical skills and you're methodical and follow the process carefully its worth having a go, especially if you're on a limited budget or just resent paying the Triumph dealers a fortune.:mad:
     
    • Winner Winner x 1

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. By using this website you agree to our Cookies usage. We and our partners operate globally and use cookies, including for analytics, personalisation, ads and Newsletters:
    Dismiss Notice