675.cc • Triumph 675 Forum

Cam Chain Tensioner

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Tweaks' started by keithspurs2000, May 26, 2009.

  1. keithspurs2000

    keithspurs2000

    Thread Starter

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    Location: Market Drayton
    Has anyone had an issue with the cam chain tensioner giving the 7500 rpm rattle? Just dropped my bike off at the dealer to have it checked out.
     
  2. whay does it sound like?
     
  3. Graham H675

    Graham H675

    258
    1
    18
    Location: surrey
    yes had it nosiey from 4k to about 8k
     
  4. some other forums mention it alot
     
  5. keithspurs2000

    keithspurs2000

    Thread Starter

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    Location: Market Drayton
    I just got of the phone to the dealer and they said there is nothing wrong. May get a second opinion off another dealer if its still there though. Other than that the only option is to buy the manual tensioner and have them put that on. Graham did you get yours fixed then?
     
  6. Graham H675

    Graham H675

    258
    1
    18
    Location: surrey
    yes mate not a prob with my dealer they manualy adjusted the tensioner now sound like it should
     
  7. If you use the APE cam chain tensioner you wont have that problem and its a pretty cheap and reliable fix!
     
  8. superpete675

    superpete675

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    16
    Location: London
    My bike recently started doing the same thing from about 4000rpm. I've taken it in several times already and they've reported that there's been nothing wrong and not even with the cam chain tensioner. The sound is difficult to describe but the best way I can explain it is like the sound of a plastic piece being repeatedly flicked at speed like thumbing the pages of a book - doesn't sound like a metal to metal sort of sound but of course that could well be the case, like with maybe a loose washer :erm:

    It's really doing my head in and I'm tempted to install a manual cam chain tensioner just to try and rule that out :doh:

    Does anyone have any thoughts on what that could be or had similar experiences?
     
  9. I think mine is doing the same thing....would also be interested if anyone has any ideas?
     
  10. The dreaded rattle came to my attention around the 5k mark. I bought a USA manual tensioner and fitted it. Pretty straight forward just don't c*ck up your timing by rotating the crank inadvertantly!!
    Only issue I found was that the O ring supplied with it proved to be too loose and developed a slight leak on track. Easily fixed once I realised where it was coming from but annoying just the same.
    My advice is to buy the Trumpet version. It seems to properly machined rather than having a 'bolt with the head machined down. A touch more expensive but by the time you factor in the cut given to HM Customs it isn't too bad.
    Hope this helps
     
  11. You can gey an APE off of ebay for about $50US. Thats where I got mine off of easy mod. very reliable Purpose: To race modify your bike for racing and track day use, or as in my case, to eliminate once and for all the annoying buzzing/rattling from the cam chain. If you suffer this noise, which is fairly obvious and sounds like a rattle or buzz that occurs between 6000~8000 RPM and comes from the right upper side of the engine, near the handlebar area, you can eliminate it with the race CCT. The OEM CCT will only apply so much tension, and if your cam chain loosens over time, sufficient tensioning may no longer be applied by the OEM CCT, and at these RPMs the cam chain can actually start to rattle against the insides of the crank case, creating a very annoying sound. It could cause possible damage if left unchecked, leading to the cam chain snapping (as it did in my case). Although this issue has never been formally addressed by Triumph, they have in fact replaced their OEM CCT in the new for '09 Daytona with a new type. I recommend this mod to anybody experiencing the cam chain rattle/noise because it is an inexpensive and fairly simple fix to a potentially devastating and annoying issue with our bikes.

    What You Need:

    Race Cam Chain Tensioner ($105) from www.pure-triumph.com or ($52) from http://www.aperaceparts.com
    Basic tools (metric sockets, wrenches, nothing you won't already have from tooling on the 675).

    Opening the crank case:

    1. Leave motorcycle on side stand, in Neutral and allow to cool completely. Remove only the right side fairing.

    2. Remove the crankcase cover bolts, and make note of the one with the copper sealing washer (it is obvious where it goes when you put it back together).



    3. Remove the crankcase cover and the crankcase sealing gasket. Clean the gasket of any oil and put aside for later. (If gasket is in poor shape you should replace it with a new one. It does not require silicone gasket maker sealer.)

    4. Using a socket wrench (24mm socket), turn the crank clockwise until you reach Top Dead Center (TDC) which is when the little dot on the gear (1) lines up with the marker line (2) in the engine case.



    5. Find a suitable wedge (piece of wood, rubber tubing, rag) to wedge between the cam chain tensioner guide and the crankcase wall to keep tension on the cam chain so it will not move when removing the old cam chain tensioner.



    Removing the old tensioner:

    1. Remove the center nut on the CCT and remove the spring inside it.

    2. Remove the two bolts securing the CCT and remove the entire CCT unit.




    Installing the Race CCT:

    1. Assemble the Race CCT if necessary by putting the small o-ring on the long plunger bolt and apply some oil to it and thread it through the race CCT body. Thread it all the way through so that it is in it's fully backed-out position (as pictured below). Loosely thread the lock-nut to the threaded part of the plunger bolt. Apply the large o-ring to the Race CCT body and apply some oil to that o-ring as well.



    2. Install the Race CCT and secure it with the two bolts provided. Torque to 9 N-m.

    3. Hand tighten the plunger until you feel it meet some resistance when it contacts the cam chain tensioner guide (you won't see it so you have to go by feel). When you are sure you have hand-tightened the plunger up against the guide, you can safely remove the wedge you were using.

    4. Now (using a 24mm socket) begin turning the crank again in a clockwise direction while applying light hand-tightening pressure on the plunger. Whenever there is slack you will feel the plunger tighten, that is, it will screw in bit by bit as it takes up the slack while rotating the crank. Continue until the plunger no longer tightens/turns while rotating the crank and all the slack has been taken up.

    5. Now back the plunger off 1/4 turn.

    6. Now tighten down the lock nut to a torque of 9 N-m, and make sure the plunger does not turn while tightening the lock nut.


    Reassembly:

    1. Put the crankcase gasket in place. (Clean it off of any old oil that may be on it.)

    2. Put the crank case cover in place, and secure with original bolts to a torque of 9 N-m. Make sure to replace the copper washer to it's appropriate location.

    3. Replace the right side fairing.

    4. Ride or race!

    Conclusion:

    I have done this mod and my cam chain noises, buzzes, rattles, vibrations - whatever we call them - the annoying stuff that our bike does between 6000~8000 RPM have been eliminated! This has to be one of my favorite mods as a result because the bike is simply perfect again. It's also nice to know that if the buzz comes back for any reason, it's easy enough to re-adjust the Race CCT to take up any new slack that may occur in the chain, keeping the chain buzz free and safe from damaging itself.

    I hope this how-to is of use to anybody wishing to do this mod. I am not a mechanically inclined or engine person at all and I was able to do this mod with no trouble... so enjoy!
     
  12. Good post but i think the photo's are not working :(
     

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