675.cc • Triumph 675 Forum

Cracked Engine Frame Mount - 2012 Daytona

Discussion in 'General' started by Phill748, Sep 16, 2021.

  1. Phill748

    Phill748

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    Hi All,

    After a bit of advice, I was bike sharing with my mate on his (used to be mine) Daytona 675 at Jerez last week and he highsided it, damage looked not so bad except I was worried about the frame crash bung as it was bent over and ground down (I'll insert pictures in next post).

    It appears it's actually cracked the mount on the engine, which is absolutely gutting. Has anyone had similar thing happen? I guess it's a new Engine, or at least a new Cylinder head and rebuild of the engine.

    What would you do? it's a 2012 bike so not sure if dropping in a 765 engine is possible? I've seen it done but using 2013 frames and not sure you can do it on the older one. Would appreciate some thoughts on it.

    Cheers.
     
  2. Phill748

    Phill748

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    IMG_2880.JPG

    IMG_2879.JPG

    4ca9548d-b3e2-4093-a5d5-65ac759b8ca1.jpg


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  3. panos_zip

    panos_zip

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    It can be repaired. I have seen it in other engines, dirt bikes as well. Its alluminum.
    It wont be easy, and of course not cheap as you have to add the labour of the cylinder head removal, machine shop, gaskets etc.
    I believe that you could find videos on youtube welding engine cases or mounts.

    You could also change the cylinder head with a second hand one, which is safer but also costly.
    You could choose any head from 2006-2012. Even one from a street triple but using your cams/springs.
    Also you could machine the cylinder head while it in your hands to increase performance.


    All 675/765 engines from 2006 to 2021 can physically fit the frame. Its just adds up the cost by a lot as you have to make changes to some parts (electrics, exhaust etc.). It can be done, and has been done by many people in this forum as well.

    In any case, I would suggest to have the frame checked. The damage may have affect the frame as well in that area.
     
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  4. Phill748

    Phill748

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    Yeah, I think he's looking to get it welded, it's whether it needs taking apart or whether it can be done in situ.

    I agree on the frame, he works for an engineering company so he can get crack test stuff and a light to check the frame, but his company doesn't do this sort of thing for repair, so he still needs to find another company to repair it.
     
  5. StMarks

    StMarks PTG

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    That's a real mess, to add to his misfortune. :((
    As regards the ",, taking apart or,,," probably the best advice for that would come from the person who's doing the welding.?
    Fwiw, ^ that's specifically why I have always gone for the crash bungs mounted on their own braced bar fixed between two points. Too hard an impact damages the brace bar, rather than the bike.
     
  6. Motorliner in maidstone will check frame for you, is the lockstop broken, if so it normally knocks the headstock over a bit.
    You have to send the bike fully stripped, with just rolling frame and engine. He also does welding if safe on frame.
    You can normally check yourself with two straight edges along the back wheel, and check distance to front wheel either side.
    3 or 4mm out can be reduced by adjusting chain, but much more needs to go in the jig to be heated and pushed over.

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  7. Those bloody crash bungs don’t save anything, you have to damage the fairing just to fit them & then you get issues like this.
    What a shame, gutted for you Phil. those 11/12 675R’s are so rare now.
    Parts are sparse too, their is a pair of mint side fairings currently for sale on Facebook but their advertised at £300 for the pair.

    engine wise personally I’d replace the cylinder head.
    a Top end rebuild won’t be crazy money depending on whereabouts you are & who you now.

    mum sure I have a few leftover Arrow Rearset spares should you need any.
     
  8. Phill748

    Phill748

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    Yeah, cylinder head might be the best option, but he’s still having a think about what to do. He has another set of fairings and tank, which he’s thinking about getting sprayed professionally, otherwise it’s not a ridiculous list of parts other than the engine.

    The mushroom is my fault really, when I owned the bike I wanted to change the fairings and didn’t want to have holes so I fitted these ones and sold the gb racing ones which brace across both engine mounts. I have no idea why, been beating myself up about not having properly thought about it but it’s done now. I guess maybe I didn’t think this would really happen, I’ve seen the stories but I’ve never seen it for my own eyes until now.

    I think he has two schools of thought given it was so mint, one is to have it as a track bike, de cat, aftermarket handlebars and race fairings and the other is to turn it back to mint road bike and get a track bike.

    In other news here is a video of me on it, about 1 hour before my mate took it out and went rocket man! Worth noting how well the Sigma slipper clutch he has works, we had a warped brake disc which maybe sapped a bit of confidence in the braking but otherwise it was on form!






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  9. That’s a great video. Very different from the normal boring front only jobs.
     
  10. Phill748

    Phill748

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    Thanks mate, yeah the raw footage is 360 and then you create the edit with the views you want in each section so you could make lots of videos from one master all showing different things.


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