675.cc • Triumph 675 Forum

HOW TO - Fit chain and sprockets....

Discussion in 'How To's' started by AngelGrinder, Dec 19, 2009.

  1. AngelGrinder

    AngelGrinder

    Thread Starter

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    Location: Stevenage, Herts
    As promised, here is my guide on changing your chain and sprockets without the breaker/rivetter tool. The only specialist tools I needed were the 36mm socket for the front sprocket (£10 from halfords/local tool shop) and an anglegrinder which I borrowed from a friend, and used an old helmet as a face guard :lol:

    .....Ok, I've never fitted or removed a chain or sprockets, and found this to be nice and easy to do, and just want to show everyone how easy it is!



    You will need -



    36mm socket (for front sprocket nut)

    27mm socket (for rear axle nut)

    8mm socket (for rear sprocket nuts)

    Angle-grinder

    Flat head screwdriver

    Hammer

    12mm and 13mm spanner (for chain adjuster bolts)

    Molegrips





    Ok, so first off, you need to remove the sprocket cover -



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1910.jpg



    Remove the one bolt from the top, and 2 from the bottom. Once these are out, you need to wrestle the cover out - it can be quite awkward, but the plastic is strong and flexible, so don't worry about being gentle!



    Now, you can see the front sprocket, and behind it, the locking washer with a folded over edge. On this picture, it is on the bottom left hand side. Use a screwdriver/pliers to get this folded back out.



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1912.jpg



    Now, get a friend, and your 36mm socket. Get friend to stand on otherside of bike, pushing down on the front and rear brake to stop the bike moving. Make sure the bike is in neutral - you don't want to damage the final drive systems....I can't imagine any of that is cheap to fix!



    Now, undo the nut on the sprocket. Not all the way, just loosen it off. (Note - You can do it with just yourself, I managed to tighten it myself. Sit on the bike, on the sidestand. With your right hand and leg on the brakes, use your other hand to use the wrench on the nut).



    Ok, so now your front sprocket is ready to come off, put the bike up on the paddock stand.



    You need to get the rear wheel out, first, back both chain adjusting bolts right back to the front. Now take off the 27mm nut, and remove the washer and adjuster block....



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1913.jpg



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1916.jpg



    Unhook the chain from the rear sprocket, if your chain was as stretched as mine....this will be easy!



    Now, gently with a hammer (rubber mallet ideally) tap the end of the axle, it will start pushing it through to the right side. As it does so, start supporting the wheel. Remove wheel as it comes out, and the rear caliper will come free also, hook this over the swingarm for now.



    Once you have the wheel out, slide the axle back through to support the chain and caliper while you change the sprocket.



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1918.jpg



    Now, you need to remove the 6 8mm bolts from the sprocket.



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1919.jpg



    And just pull the sprocket off. I took this opportunity to clean behind the sprocket on the wheel, and I also cleaned the chain runners and all around the front sprocket with de-greaser.



    Put new sprocket on, and put the bolts back on. I used thread-locker on these for extra security.

    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1924.jpg



    Now, to get the old chain off. Get out your angle-grinder and eye protection (I used an old helmet). Find the master link (it is gold and the pins will look hollow rather than a big metal rivit as the normal ones do).



    Grind off the 2 hollow rivets.



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1927.jpg



    Now, get your screwdriver in between the rivets, and hammer it. Hard! Eventually it will come apart... Now, just pull it out of the bike.



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1929.jpg



    Now, take off the front sprocket, the washer sits behind the nut, but infront of the sprocket. Here is the order they sit in on the bike -



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1930.jpg



    Now, put the rear wheel back in, using the reverse of fitting. Here is the new sprocket on, and a picture of the order the spacer, washer and axle nut go on. Don't do the nut up tight yet - you will need to adjust the chain when fitted.



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1931.jpg



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1932.jpg





    Now, fit the new front sprocket, again, don't do it up properly - you will want to take the bike off the stand and sit on the brakes to do it up properly.



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1935.jpg



    Now, get your new chain and run it round the sprockets to fit it on both. You may need to shorten the chain, do this by using the angle grinder and screwdriver trick, until you reach the right length. You want it so the links are touching, and the chain is a tight as it will go with the axel as far forward as it will go. BUT, if you cut off too many links, you will have to go and find another from a shop, so take it steady, and only take off if you are sure!



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1946.jpg



    You can see where there is no link in this picture, it is at the back and to the top of the sprocket.



    You now need to push the new master link from the bag your chain came in, from the back of the chain, so the rivets face the outside of the chain. Make sure you put the rubber x-rings or o-rings on as per the instructions with the chain.



    Now, push the new gold link over the top of the link, and use the mole grips to clamp it on.



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1950.jpg



    Take your time with this. Just get gradually tighter and tighter, until the 2 rivets begin to show through. Keep going until you have 1 or 2 mm showing through.



    Then, using something metal on the back of the chain to hit it against (I used a second hammer) hit the front rivet until it squashes. In this picture, the top rivet has been hit, the bottom is how it should look after being clamped on.



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1952.jpg





    Hammer both until they are flat, and you are happy there is no way it is going to come off.



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1957.jpg





    Now, adjust the chain until is has the right amount of free play. and do the rear axle nut up to 110nm. Take the bike off the stand. Do the front sprocket nut up to 85nm, and fold he washer over with some pliers.





    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1959.jpg





    And your done! Replace the front sprocket cover and you are good to go!



    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1962.jpg



    Hope this helps, and can show how easy it is to do, even without a chain splitter and riveter tool! You may be able to use a dremel or drill to remove the old rivets, but I couldn't say if they work or not!



    Have fun, and I hope I help someone to change their chain!
     
  2. excellent mate...many thanks :smileup: nice sprocket too.
     
  3. andysjt

    andysjt

    1,476
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    Location: staffordshire
    very good guide , thanks for the time & effort you have taken to do it
    just a quick question
    how many miles did you do on the stock set before you changed them ? or was it changed for cosmetic reasons only ?
     
  4. AngelGrinder

    AngelGrinder

    Thread Starter

    112
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    Location: Stevenage, Herts
    I was on about 14,000 miles on the stock chain. You could tell it was getting near the end of it life, as it was getting silly....I would tighten it, go to work and come home, and it would have loosened (30miles) and I was tightening it every week.
     
  5. AngelGrinder

    AngelGrinder

    Thread Starter

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    Location: Stevenage, Herts
    Just a quick addition.

    I took a picture of both chains lined up so you can see how much they stretch. The dark one is obviously the old one. The new one has an extra link on it when I took the picture, so have marked with a red line at 116 links, which is the same as the old one!

    ai6.photobucket.com_albums_y209_angelgrinder187_DSCF1938_2.jpg
     
  6. henrymc

    henrymc

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    Location: lincoln
    Well done Anglegrinder, :smileup: top post.
     
  7. Was that a freudian slip, but i do agree - top post.
     
  8. si675

    si675

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    Location: aberdeen
    nice rear sprocket what make is it cheers -top post
     
  9. AngelGrinder

    AngelGrinder

    Thread Starter

    112
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    Location: Stevenage, Herts
  10. im fancying one of these sprockets, but bikes only done 5k miles. Would it be ok to swap just the sprocket or would i need to do the chain too? im thinking they'd wear together.
     
  11. D41

    D41

    13,993
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    Location: Orange, CA
    Excellent "How-To", mate!!

    Can you not just leave the bike in gear???



    Yeah, you would probably be OK, but if it's just for looks that you want to do this then it's a bit of a waste IMO - Wait a while & then do the 520 chain/sprocket conversion...or do it now - you have a good guide for it!!
     
  12. AngelGrinder

    AngelGrinder

    Thread Starter

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    Location: Stevenage, Herts
    With leaving it in gear....there is the tiniest possibility of damaging the output shaft. This may be extremely unlikely....but not a risk I wanted to take.....as it would be expensive!

    Another way to do it, if by yourself, would be to chuck a bit of wood through the back wheel spokes, and then turn it so it rests on the swingarm - the chain can't turn then.
     
  13. lost

    lost

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    Location: east sussex
    good guide mate even with the breaker/riviter its wise to use the angle grinder trick as the pins tend to bend or break
     
  14. Stu

    Stu

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    Location: Leeds
    I've done chains and rear sprockets in the past but never a front. How easy is it to get off and are there any tips.
     
  15. D41

    D41

    13,993
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    Location: Orange, CA
    It's a piece of cake, Stu - just make sure that you straighten out the washer BEFORE you loosen the nut, and be absolutely SURE that you crimp it back over after you've changed the sprocket - I used a "drive-bar" to get the washer fully crimped over the nut in 2 places, just for added piece of mind.
     
  16. ermmm whats a drive bar?
     
  17. D41

    D41

    13,993
    144
    63
    Location: Orange, CA
    Sorry, - tradesman tool - basically a tool designed for hitting nails, or in this case a washer, that isn't accessible with a hammer...you place the end of the drive-bar over the washer and wallop the middle section with a hammer whilst holding the other end of the drive-bar.
     
  18. Ah i get it :) i think lol
     
  19. What a great post I wish I had looked at it before today as I have had chain and sprockets replace, tsubaki kit by local shop not a bad price £182.50 inc labour, laguna triumph wanted £285.00 all in!!!!
     
  20. RSVr

    RSVr

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    85nm is quite high for a front sprocket so i would put the bike on the sidestand and get some one to put the front and rear brakes on, and then undo the sprocket
     

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