675.cc • Triumph 675 Forum

R6 Yesterday

Discussion in 'General' started by Stu, Aug 5, 2008.

  1. Stu

    Stu

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    I had to go to Harrogate yesterday to the place where our network is hosted. This being Wet Yorkshire (it was dry for once though) I put my textiles on and I had a rucksac so I looked like some bimbling commuter. Not far from my house were some temporary traffic lights so I filtered to the front and pulled up behind an R6. I was looking at the riders gear when it dawned on me that his boots, helmet and leathers all looked brand new but the bike was a few years old. I thought, Ot-oh, new rider. The lights changed and he took off like a bat out of hell. Good I thought until he stamped on the brakes at the first corner. I thought he was going to get off and wheel it round. Soon as the bend opened up he was off again. This was hampering me a he was using the whole lane for his slow speed manouvers. Anyway I got him on a bend and I don't think he was too happy :) On the straight he cained it to catch up with me but - OH MY GOD - another bend. On the brakes and back he drops. As I hadn't changed speed for the bend I left him for dead. Soon I could see him in my mirrors caining the tits off of it to catch me up until - Yep, another bend. This carried on all the way to Harrogate, about 15 miles until I totally left him for dead and turned off.

    Although I was amused I couldn't help thinking that any [email protected] can ride fast in a straight line and if he can't corner, one day he'll get into some trouble and wind up dead. I really do wish they would teach people to corner on the bike test. Counter steering has saved my bacon on more than one occasion. I may have to start a counter steering poll to see who uses it.
     
  2. Craig

    Craig Administrator Staff Member

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    Seems to be the problem with a lot of riders these days, they have the machine but no talent to ride it. I will always recommend the IAMS ride safe groups as you get taught a lot you wouldn't during the test. Mind you that's not my main gripe about some riders; least he had the correct gear on - nothing worse than seeing someone on a motorbike with just shorts, t-shirt, trainers and a helmet. No doubt he'll end up another statistic on the road that will make the rest of us look bad. :roll:
     
  3. Stu

    Stu

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    +1 for the IAM. I passed my advanced test about 4 years ago. My missus passed her's about 2 years ago. We are both better and safer riders for doing it and I swear it has kept me alive. I was a bit of a knob when I was a newbie.
     
  4. Counter Steering has saved me once or twice too, it seems so unnatural at first, especially when your already leant over quite a way!

    I was considering doing an advanced riding course, you both reckon its worth doing then?

    Some peoples riding does seem astonishing when your out and about, its hard to believe how some of them are still alive!!
     
  5. Stu

    Stu

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    Stu, I can't recommend it highly enough. You don't even need to find your nearest group as I've already done that for you. :D

    What I got out of it was my life. I was very aggressive on the bike and couldn't corner well. My observations are honed in and I now don't over take because I have to. I plan my overtakes and do it when it's safe to do so. When I was training for the test I actually slowed down as I was thinking about my riding but I ride faster now as my riding is a lot smoother. Just do it.

    http://www.solent-advanced-motorcyclists.co.uk/
     
  6. Thanks Dad!! :D :lol:

    I will take a look into it, its the same old, i consider myself a good rider, and it isnt until you learn stuff from these sort of things and trackdays you realise how your actually not that good at all!
     
  7. I am pretty slow round corners .. slower than in my Peugot 106 in fact! haha I only passed my test in June and don't really know how fast is sensible and safe. I've always been one to err on the side of caution. I'm most worried about finding a big tractor in the middle of a corner and having to brake. The IAM thingy looks pretty good. Do you think I should join up now or wait until it stops raining (I think the climate model predicts about 2030!)
     
  8. Daytonadave

    Daytonadave

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    Have you got a mate with a few years experience you can follow? If he is a good mate he will not try to leave you standing, you can learn a lot from following an experienced rider.
    :cool:
     
  9. Hi, I passed my test 7 years ago and had a GSXR600 for a couple of years but have not ridden for the last 4 (bike had to go to pay for wedding!). :(

    Today I paid for my 675 and it gets delivered tomorrow morning (I feel like a child on Christmas eve)! :D

    Having now lost all my experience I was thinking of doing the IAM course but was wondering on average what it costs? :?:
     
  10. Stu

    Stu

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    Hi OOWH

    I paid £85 when I did mine with the York group. Where are you based? It's well worth the money.
     
  11. Thanks, that doesnt sound too painfull.

    I'm based near Preston
     
  12. Stu

    Stu

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  13. Thanks for this. I'll give them a call.

    Have just been out on the quiet roads for half an hour. At speed I'm fine but I know that my observations are letting me down though.

    The bike is brilliant!!!
     
  14. SV_Justin

    SV_Justin

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    Going back to the beginning of the thread, I agree with StuRowcliffe, counter steering does feel completely unnatural at first. But as you get to know you bike and explore its limits, you'd be surprised what it can do before it will say its had enough. People who are fearful of leaning the bike over and adding a smidge of counter steer in corners more frequently than not, are not comfortable or not familiar with their bike and it limitations.
    Get to know your bike, go out on a good dry warm day on some nice twisty quiet roads, or a track is even better and experiment with your bike. You will be surprised what is can do on a good surface with some nice warm tyres. The IAM is also a fantastic way of not just becoming a more defensive and more aware rider, but they also show you how to become more confident and explore what your machine is really capable of.
    Any prat can ride fast in a straight line
     
  15. I signed up for the IAM at the NEC on Saturday and was also surprised by how many others seemed to be signing up around me. It was £109 all in, lessons, test, etc, which I think is really good as I'd already paid £75 for a half day refresher with a local riding school! Really looking forward to it but I don't think I'm going to start until the new year, when the weather is better.
     
  16. Craig

    Craig Administrator Staff Member

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    Yeah it's gone up a bit, but is still cheap. I don't know what it's like at other groups but the group I attended also advised on giving a few quid per session to the instructor for petrol seeing that they don't actually get paid. Still in all it's cheap and good fun. :)
     

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